Water levels increase further on Lower River Shannon

Water levels increase further on Lower River Shannon

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high-water-123208_960_720Clare County Council says water levels on the Lower River Shannon at Springfield, Clonlara, have risen by 225mm (22.5cm) since yesterday (Friday) and are now 100mm (10cm) below the peak flood level of 2009.

The Council said the current peak levels are in part due to rising water levels on the Mulkear River, which enters the River Shannon south of Annacotty.

Clare County Council Area staff, Clare County Fire & Rescue Service, The Defence Forces and Clare Civil Defence are continuing to provide support on the ground in Springfield, as well as assist in the transportation of residents of approximately a dozen properties isolated by floodwaters.

The Council meanwhile, has received confirmation from the ESB of its decision to maintain the spill rate at Parteen Weir at 470 cubic metres per second (cumecs) during today (Saturday).

Limerick City and County Council says an increase in water levels of 120 mm was measured at Castleconnell on Friday and overnight.

Council staff are continuing pumping operations in Castleconnell and Montpelier and two more pumps have been deployed to respond to the increase in water levels. Flood defences are being maintained at other flood prone locations along the river with sand bags being reinforced as required.

The Mulkear River rose to 3 metres at 6.00am this morning (Saturday) causing overspill on roads. Levels in the Mulkear are now dropping and the Mountshannon Road is passable. No property was affected.

Monitoring and pumping continue and Limerick City and County Council says staff remain on alert to ensure that the necessary responses can be immediately activated where the need arises.

Flooding advice is available on www.flooding.ie. Information included on the website includes advice on identifying flooding risks, protecting property against flooding, necessary steps to be taken if a property is flooded, and assessing and repairing property damaged by flooding.

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