Funding available for traditional farm buildings

Funding available for traditional farm buildings

SHARE

Clare County Council is encouraging farmers to consider applying for an annual grants scheme for the conservation and repair of traditional farm buildings and related structures.

The Heritage Council, in partnership with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, is opening the annual 2018 GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme to farmers approved in the GLAS Scheme.

The principal objective of this scheme is to ensure that traditional farm buildings and other related structures that contribute to the character of the landscape, and are of significant heritage value, are conserved for active agricultural use.

Grant amounts vary between €4,000 and €25,000. A grant award will not be for more than 75% of the cost of the works with a maximum available grant of €25,000. The grant is available for the conservation of traditional farm outbuildings, including roof, walls, structural repairs, windows and doors. The grant is also available for other related farm structures including historic yard surfaces, walls, gate pillars and gates.

The key conservation principle of minimum intervention should apply, that is, carrying out a repair to fix what is wrong but not setting out to do too much work. Works which are, in the opinion of the Heritage Council, restoration works, are very unlikely to be supported with grant aid. The process is highly competitive and it is expected that 50-70 projects will be supported in 2018.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications for the 2018 GLAS Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme is 5pm Friday 24 November 2017

Forms and accompanying documentation such as photos, maps etc should be posted to

Traditional Farm Buildings Grant Scheme 2018

The Heritage Council

Church Lane

Kilkenny

*Applications made by fax or email will not be accepted. Only farmers approved in the GLAS Scheme are eligible to apply.

SHARE

Chief Reporter Pat Flynn has worked as a journalist for almost 30 years. His career began during the late 1980s when, like many aspiring radio presenters of the time, he worked for local pirate radio stations in Clare and Limerick.

Pat joined Clare FM in 1990 where he worked as researcher initially and later presented several different programmes including the station’s flagship current affairs programme.

He was also the station’s News Editor and Deputy Controller of Programmes. Despite leaving in 2003 to pursue a career as a freelance journalist, he continues to work with the station to this day.

As well as being the Clare Herald’s Chief Reporter Pat is also freelance journalist and broadcaster, contributing to Ireland’s national newspapers and is a regular contributor to national broadcasters.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY