Damaged windshield forces jet to divert to Shannon

Damaged windshield forces jet to divert to Shannon

SHARE

A transatlantic jet has been forced to divert to Shannon Airport last night after a cockpit window was damaged in flight.

American Airlines flight AA-141 was travelling from London to New York at the time. There were 168 passengers and a crew of 13 on board.

The flight had taken off from Heathrow at around 7.48pm and was less than an hour into its journey when the crew reported a problem.

The Boeing 777-200 jet was routing overhead Ireland when the crew informed air traffic controllers at Shannon that they wished to divert to the mid-west airport. The crew confirmed they had suffered “damage to the front windscreen.”

The flight was cleared to descend and route towards Shannon where airport fire and rescue crews had been placed on standby. The aircraft was over Co Sligo at the time.

File Photo: © The Clare Herald 2017

The crew commenced their descent from 38,000ft as they diverted to Shannon and landed safely at 9.10pm. The pilot had reported that they expected to make a normal landing and didn’t require airport fire crews to follow them along the runway.

After landing, the jet taxied to the terminal where airport ground crews were waiting to disembark the passengers. The flight has since been cancelled and the passengers have been sent to hotels for the night.

The damage to the window directly in front of the captain’s position had been shattered although it wasn’t immediately known how this happened. The other five cockpit windows did not appear to have been damaged.

The damage to the captain’s windshield.

An Airline spokesperson confirmed: “AA141 from London (LHR) to New York (JFK) diverted to Shannon due to a mechanical issue. The Boeing 777-200 Took off from London at 7.48pm local time and landed in Shannon at 9:10pm local time.

The flight will remain overnight in Shannon. Customers will be provided with overnight hotel accommodation, and a replacement aircraft will continue the journey Tuesday morning. We never want to disrupt our customers’ travel plans, and we are sorry for the trouble this has caused,” airline added.

 

SHARE
Chief Reporter Pat Flynn has worked as a journalist for almost 30 years. His career began during the late 1980s when, like many aspiring radio presenters of the time, he worked for local pirate radio stations in Clare and Limerick. Pat joined Clare FM in 1990 where he worked as researcher initially and later presented several different programmes including the station's flagship current affairs programme. He was also the station's News Editor and Deputy Controller of Programmes. Despite leaving in 2003 to pursue a career as a freelance journalist, he continues to work with the station to this day. As well as being the Clare Herald’s Chief Reporter Pat is also freelance journalist and broadcaster, contributing to Ireland’s national newspapers and is a regular contributor to national broadcasters.

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY